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....NOT MY PRESIDENT...NOT NOW...NOT EVER !!!!!!!!!!

DON'T BLAME ME...I VOTED FOR KERRY !!!!!!



...... "Too many good docs are getting out of the business.

......Too many OB/GYN's aren't able to practice their...their love with women all across the country."�GEORGE BUSH

Sept. 6, 2004, Poplar Bluff, Mo.

TIME TO STOP THE MADNESS. END THE "STOP LOSS" ORDER. BRING OUR MEN AND WOMEN HOME. SAVE THEIR LIVES! SAY NO TO THE DRAFT !



Mr. "BRING IT ON" Man, got his ass kicked by his own bicycle!

Scientific experiment to PROVE the economy is "ON FIRE" and there are lots of
high paying jobs being created. Heck, you can't even turn around without being offered a six figure CEO position, right? LOLOLOL...MORE of "THE BIG LIE"!
FULL MOON BLUEZ, FROM CODEWARRIORZ THOUGHTS
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CodeWarriorz Thoughts: Sunday, November 28, 2004 CodeWarriorZ BlueZ

CodeWarriorz Thoughts

Day to day musings of free speech activist CodeWarrior.

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Sunday, November 28, 2004

 

local6.com - News - Jawbreaker Candy Explodes, Burns Fla. Girl's Face

local6.com - News - Jawbreaker Candy Explodes, Burns Fla. Girl's Face
--------------------SNIP=======================
The Mythbusters TV show on DSC channel did a variety of experiments trying to debunk this, but found to their surprise,
that it is possible to get an exploding jawbreaker candy under various heat sources.

 

GSB: DCDave's Column

GSB: DCDave's Column
Stinnett's book is not a dissection of the Roberts report, however. That job has already been performed by the historian, John Toland, with his "Infamy: Pearl Harbor and Its Aftermath." Stinett has gone far beyond Toland through use of the Freedom of Information Act and years of digging in the archives and hunting down U. S. military personnel and foreign diplomats who knew with great precision exactly when and where the Japanese would attack. They had duly relayed the information to Washington, but, as it turned out, Kimmel and Short were systematically kept in the dark.

The case, as Stinnett lays it out, is open and shut. We had broken all the Japanese radio codes. We knew what the commanders were telling the ships at sea. We knew what Tokyo was telling its diplomats around the world. We even knew what a spy in Hawaii was reporting back to Tokyo. Even without having broken the codes, we knew from directional analysis that there was a large fleet in the North Pacific poised to strike Hawaii. The Japanese attack fleet had been forced to abandon radio silence when a fierce storm had separated the ships beyond the reach of light signals.

Honor bound to protect their men, Kimmel and Short might have taken pre-emptive measures that would have deprived Roosevelt of the dramatic national affront that he needed to persuade the country to join in the battle against the Axis powers, particularly Germany. Germany and Japan had signed a mutual defense treaty which obligated each to go to war against the belligerent opponents of the other. That Germany would oblige Roosevelt and declare war on the United States as soon as the U.S. was at war with Japan was therefore a given.

Stinnett has been faulted for reading too much into a policy recommendation from a junior Naval Intelligence officer that he discovered in the Archives in 1995. In that document, a series of provocations against Japan are prescribed as a means of forcing Japan into war with the United States. It so happens that Roosevelt followed the recommendations almost to the letter. It is indeed remarkable that a lieutenant commander in the Navy should have so much influence over the nation's commander in chief, even if his suggestions were endorsed by his superior, a captain.

Had he waited a couple more years to publish his book, Stinnett would not have had to lean so heavily upon this document to show that Roosevelt was determined to bring the U.S. into the war against Germany, whether by provoking Japan or by any other means. He would have had the new book by Thomas E. Mahl, "Desperate Deception, British Covert Operations in the United States, 1939-1944," to refer to. The British certainly wanted the United States to join the war, and whatever the Brits wanted, Roosevelt was more than willing to deliver, even if he had to subvert American democracy to do it. Mahl doesn't explain exactly why Roosevelt was so compliant except to suggest that he and his advisers had superior knowledge to that of the American public about the unique evil of Britain's Nazi adversaries.

Such high mindedness, however, has hardly been the hallmark of the numerous instances of official deceit that have followed the Pearl Harbor trickery. Perhaps it was a matter of Roosevelt being as much in thrall to those awful "money-changers" he denounced in his speeches as were the British. Mahl notes, after all, that a whole floor of Rockefeller Center in New York was used by the British intelligence service that was corrupting our institutions to get us into the war, and with no rent charged by the owners. When one begins to unravel a web of deceit, it's hard to know when he has reached the end.

 

Capitol Hill Blue: The High Price of Political Rhetoric

The High Price of Political Rhetoric
By TOM RAUM
Nov 28, 2004, 06:39
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President Bush says politicians should say what they mean. But doing so can sometimes be an invitation to disaster, as Arlen Specter, John Kerry, John Snow and Bush himself can attest.
Specter, who supports abortion rights, nearly cost himself the chairmanship of the Senate Judiciary Committee after he outraged social conservatives by suggesting recently that Supreme Court nominees who oppose abortion would have a hard time winning confirmation.

With Democrats likely to filibuster such a nominee, the moderate Pennsylvania Republican was simply expressing a political reality. But the timing of his remarks could not have been worse, coming as election-emboldened Senate Republicans looked toward filling top committee slots.

Specter had to grovel for support, promising to move expeditiously on all of Bush's nominees, including any who might oppose the Roe v. Wade decision that established abortion rights.

Treasury Secretary Snow, just weeks before the election, characterized reports of net job losses under Bush as a "myth" when he visited Ohio, which has lost many manufacturing jobs.

Bush went on to win Ohio and the election, but the remark struck a sour chord in an otherwise well-orchestrated campaign. Snow was referring to the fact that the Labor Department's survey of households showed employment gains during Bush's term, while the more-cited payroll survey showed a loss. That distinction was lost in the political hubbub.

Why do seasoned officeholders and politicians sometimes seem to have a tin ear?

"The fact that they talk a lot suggests they should be better at it. But it also gives them a lot more opportunity" to create problems, said Wayne Fields, an expert on political rhetoric at Washington University in St. Louis.

Furthermore, many such statements are on videotape, played over and over on 24-hour cable news outlets. "It's scrutinized, sliced and diced," Fields said. Also, many politicians "have the kind of egos that invite such mistakes," he said.

Kerry may wish he never said he voted for $87 billion to help pay Iraq war costs "before I voted against it." The Bush campaign used the remark repeatedly to ridicule him, both in television commercials and stump speeches.


The High Price of Political Rhetoric
By TOM RAUM
Nov 28, 2004, 06:39
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President Bush says politicians should say what they mean. But doing so can sometimes be an invitation to disaster, as Arlen Specter, John Kerry, John Snow and Bush himself can attest.
Specter, who supports abortion rights, nearly cost himself the chairmanship of the Senate Judiciary Committee after he outraged social conservatives by suggesting recently that Supreme Court nominees who oppose abortion would have a hard time winning confirmation.

With Democrats likely to filibuster such a nominee, the moderate Pennsylvania Republican was simply expressing a political reality. But the timing of his remarks could not have been worse, coming as election-emboldened Senate Republicans looked toward filling top committee slots.

Specter had to grovel for support, promising to move expeditiously on all of Bush's nominees, including any who might oppose the Roe v. Wade decision that established abortion rights.

Treasury Secretary Snow, just weeks before the election, characterized reports of net job losses under Bush as a "myth" when he visited Ohio, which has lost many manufacturing jobs.

Bush went on to win Ohio and the election, but the remark struck a sour chord in an otherwise well-orchestrated campaign. Snow was referring to the fact that the Labor Department's survey of households showed employment gains during Bush's term, while the more-cited payroll survey showed a loss. That distinction was lost in the political hubbub.

Why do seasoned officeholders and politicians sometimes seem to have a tin ear?

"The fact that they talk a lot suggests they should be better at it. But it also gives them a lot more opportunity" to create problems, said Wayne Fields, an expert on political rhetoric at Washington University in St. Louis.

Furthermore, many such statements are on videotape, played over and over on 24-hour cable news outlets. "It's scrutinized, sliced and diced," Fields said. Also, many politicians "have the kind of egos that invite such mistakes," he said.

Kerry may wish he never said he voted for $87 billion to help pay Iraq war costs "before I voted against it." The Bush campaign used the remark repeatedly to ridicule him, both in television commercials and stump speeches.


The High Price of Political Rhetoric
By TOM RAUM
Nov 28, 2004, 06:39
Email this article
Printer friendly page

President Bush says politicians should say what they mean. But doing so can sometimes be an invitation to disaster, as Arlen Specter, John Kerry, John Snow and Bush himself can attest.
Specter, who supports abortion rights, nearly cost himself the chairmanship of the Senate Judiciary Committee after he outraged social conservatives by suggesting recently that Supreme Court nominees who oppose abortion would have a hard time winning confirmation.

With Democrats likely to filibuster such a nominee, the moderate Pennsylvania Republican was simply expressing a political reality. But the timing of his remarks could not have been worse, coming as election-emboldened Senate Republicans looked toward filling top committee slots.

Specter had to grovel for support, promising to move expeditiously on all of Bush's nominees, including any who might oppose the Roe v. Wade decision that established abortion rights.

Treasury Secretary Snow, just weeks before the election, characterized reports of net job losses under Bush as a "myth" when he visited Ohio, which has lost many manufacturing jobs.

Bush went on to win Ohio and the election, but the remark struck a sour chord in an otherwise well-orchestrated campaign. Snow was referring to the fact that the Labor Department's survey of households showed employment gains during Bush's term, while the more-cited payroll survey showed a loss. That distinction was lost in the political hubbub.

Why do seasoned officeholders and politicians sometimes seem to have a tin ear?

"The fact that they talk a lot suggests they should be better at it. But it also gives them a lot more opportunity" to create problems, said Wayne Fields, an expert on political rhetoric at Washington University in St. Louis.

Furthermore, many such statements are on videotape, played over and over on 24-hour cable news outlets. "It's scrutinized, sliced and diced," Fields said. Also, many politicians "have the kind of egos that invite such mistakes," he said.

Kerry may wish he never said he voted for $87 billion to help pay Iraq war costs "before I voted against it." The Bush campaign used the remark repeatedly to ridicule him, both in television commercials and stump speeches.

The Massachusetts Democrat was seeking to explain that he voted no the second time because the $87 billion was not covered by offsetting tax revenues. Lawmakers frequently vote one way in preliminary votes and another way on final passage. But the political damage was done.

Bush's vow to get Osama bin Laden "dead or alive," his assertion that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction and his premature "mission accomplished" speech all came back to haunt him.

There are many examples of words that politicians would like to take back - if they could.

Among them: Democrat Howard Dean's disjointed Iowa concession speech, ending with a scream; former President Clinton's statement that he had never had sexual relations "with that woman," White House intern Monica Lewinsky; the first President Bush's broken pledge: "Read my lips: no new taxes."

Also, Jimmy Carter's admission to "lust in my heart" in an interview with Playboy magazine as he campaigned for the presidency, and Bob Dole's assertion that all U.S. military conflicts of the 20th century were "Democrat wars."

Those statements all had far-reaching political repercussions - even though the speakers may have thought they were innocuous at the time.

They are not in the same league as more blatant utterances that have ended or severely damaged political careers.

Sen. Trent Lott, R-Miss., lost his post as majority leader after an offhand remark praising Sen. Strom Thurmond's segregationist presidential run. James Watt was forced to resign as interior secretary in the Reagan administration and Earl Butz was ousted as agriculture secretary in the Ford administration, both after cracking jokes that contained ethnic content.

For a politician to say something he believes to be truthful or well meaning, only to have it come back to bite, has been termed a "Mondale moment" by University of Virginia political scientist Larry Sabato. Mondale campaigned for the presidency in 1984 saying he would probably raise taxes if elected.

 

Capitol Hill Blue: Halliburton Lost U.S. Property Worth Millions in Iraq, Kuwait

Capitol Hill Blue: Halliburton Lost U.S. Property Worth Millions in Iraq, Kuwait

Halliburton Lost U.S. Property Worth Millions in Iraq, Kuwait
By JOHN SOLOMON
Nov 28, 2004, 07:50
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A third or more of the government property Halliburton Co. was paid to manage for the U.S.-led Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq could not be located by auditors, investigative reports to Congress show.
Halliburton's KBR subsidiary "did not effectively manage government property" and auditors could not locate hundreds of CPA items worth millions of dollars in Iraq and Kuwait this summer and fall, Inspector General Stuart W. Bowen reported to Congress in two reports.

Bowen's findings mark the latest bad news for Vice President Dick Cheney's former company, which is the focus of both a criminal investigation into alleged fuel price gouging and an FBI inquiry into possible favoritism from the Bush administration.

The Associated Press reported Wednesday that FBI agents have extensively interviewed an Army contracting officer who last month went public with allegations that the Bush administration was improperly awarding contracts to Halliburton without competitive bidding.

Halliburton and the Pentagon deny wrongdoing, and say they are cooperating in all investigations.


 

Holiday spending to rise-consumer groups - Nov. 22, 2004

Holiday spending to rise-consumer groups - Nov. 22, 2004
"Holiday spending boost ahead?

Calls for consumers shelling out an additional 5% due to better economy and fewer debt worries.
November 22, 2004: 12:35 PM EST



WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A rosier economic outlook will boost U.S. holiday spending by up to 5 percent this year despite a firm resolution by many consumers to spend less, a consumer group said Monday.

A joint survey by the Consumer Federation of America and the Credit Union National Association found Americans were more optimistic this year than last, though more still said they intended to cut back on holiday spending.

Thirty-two percent of those polled said they would spend less during the holidays than last year. That was down from 34 percent in 2003, while 17 percent said they planned to boost spending, up from 15 percent a year ago. This year and last, 50 percent of respondents said spending would be unchanged.


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The survey of 1,000 adults was conducted Nov. 11-14 and has a margin of error of three percentage points. "

Wait a second...did you read the last line?
"This year and last, 50 percent of respondents said spending would be unchanged. "
How does this warrant anyone to forecast a 4.5 increase in spending if at least half of them say they will NOT be spending more?

 

========Star-Telegram | 11/27/2004 | Early risers, EARLY REWARDS

Star-Telegram | 11/27/2004 | Early risers, EARLY REWARDS: "The typical American is expected to spend a little more than $700 on gifts and other holiday purchases, according to the National Retail Federation and the International Council of Shopping Centers. Forecasts for holiday sales growth range from a gain of 3 percent to 4.5 percent, which would translate into sales of as much as $219.9 billion."
===========SNIP======================
Hmmm...and with record layoffs and outsourcing, and cuts in pay, and all that...where is the average American going to get this magical 700 dollars...under the mattress?

 

FT.com / Industries / Retailing & leisure - Fears over recovery as Wal-Mart sales stall

FT.com / Industries / Retailing & leisure - Fears over recovery as Wal-Mart sales stall: "Fears over recovery as Wal-Mart sales stall "

Worries about the sustainability of the US economic recovery were stoked on Sunday after Wal-Mart, the discount retailer that is a bellwether for the country's retail sector, announced that sales grew by only 0.7 per cent in the year to November.


The world's largest retailer had estimated growth of 2 to 4 per cent just 10 days ago. But Wal-Mart revised its estimates down on Saturday evening after disappointing sales on “Black Friday”, the day after Thanksgiving so called because it is traditionally the time retailers move into profit for the year. It is an indicator of spending for the holiday season, when a quarter of annual retail sales are rung up.

Wal-Mart said sales had fallen “below plan” in the last week of November and sales growth was down on the 2.8 per cent annual rate it had reported for October.

The weakness suffered by Wal-Mart, if repeated elsewhere, would add to concerns about the durability of the US economic upturn. Widespread reluctance by consumers to maintain their free and easy spending habits would slow the economy sharply.

In recent years, and in the recession of 2001, US consumers defied predictions that their appetite for new goods would diminish. A slowdown of consumer spending would add to recent international dollar-related concerns about the prospects for exports to the US.

Although Wal-Mart reported strong sales of digital cameras, television/DVD sets, learning toys and video games, it said “customer traffic declined towards the end of the week”.

===================SNIP----------------------------
But Bush said our economy is great...how can this be????
It would only be true if he....::::SHUDDER::::: LIED TO US!

 

: prose excerpts: slaughterhouse five

"You know what I say to people when I hear they're writing anti-war books?"
"No. What do you say, Harrison Starr?"

"I say, 'Why don't you write an anti-glacier book instead?' "

What he meant, of course, was that there would always be wars, that they were as easy to stop as glaciers. I believe that too.


* * * * *
It is so short and jumbled and jangled, Sam, because there is nothing intelligent to say about a massacre. Everybody is supposed to be dead, to never say anything or want anything ever again. Everything is supposed to be very quiet after a massacre, and it always is, except for the birds.

And what do the birds say? All there is to say about a massacre, things like "Poo-tee-weet?"


* * * * *
"The most important thing I learned on Tralfamadore was that when a person dies he only appears to die. He is still very much alive in the past, so it is very silly for people to cry at his funeral. All moments, past, present and future, always have existed, always will exist. The Tralfamadorians can look at all the different moments just that way we can look at a stretch of the Rocky Mountains, for instance. They can see how permanent all the moments are, and they can look at any moment that interests them. It is just an illusion we have here on Earth that one moment follows another one, like beads on a string, and that once a moment is gone it is gone forever.

"When a Tralfamadorian sees a corpse, all he thinks is that the dead person is in a bad condition in that particular moment, but that the same person is just fine in plenty of other moments. Now, when I myself hear that somebody is dead, I simply shrug and say what the Tralfamadorians say about dead people, which is 'so it goes.'"


* * * * *
"Welcome aboard, Mr Pilgrim," said the loudspeaker. "Any questions?"

Billy licked his lips, thought a while, inquired at last: "Why me?"

"That is a very Earthling question to ask, Mr Pilgrim. Why you? Why us for that matter? Why anything? Because this moment simply is. Have you ever seen bugs trapped in amber?"

"Yes." Billy, in fact, had a paperweight in his office which was a blob of polished amber with three ladybugs embedded in it.

"Well, here we are, Mr Pilgrim, trapped in the amber of this moment. There is no why."


* * * * *
"You sound to me as though you don't believe in free will," said Billy Pilgrim.

"If I hadn't spent so much time studying Earthlings," said the Tralfamadorian, "I wouldn't have any idea what was meant by 'free will'. I've visited thirty-one inhabited planets in the universe, and I have studied reports on one hundred more. Only on Earth is there any talk of free will."


* * * * *
Billy Pilgrim says that the Universe does not look like a lot of bright little dots to the creatures from Tralfamadore. The creatures can see where each star has been and where it is going, so that the heavens are filled with rarefied, luminous spaghetti. And Tralfamadorians don't see human beings as two-legged creatures, either. They see them as great millipedes - 'with babies' legs at one end and old people's legs at the other,' says Billy Pilgrim.


* * * * *
Billy couldn't read Tralfamadorian, of course, but he could at least see how the books were laid out - in brief clumps of symbols separated by stars. Billy commented that the clumps might be telegrams.

"Exactly," said the voice.

"They are telegrams?"

"There are no telegrams on Tralfamadore. But you're right: each clump of symbols is a brief, urgent message - describing a situation, a scene. We Tralfamadorians read them all at once, not one after the other. There isn't any particular relationship between all the messages, except that the author has chosen them carefully, so that, when seen all at once, they produce an image of life that is beautiful and surprising and deep. There is no beginning, no middle, no end, no suspense, no moral, no causes, no effects. What we love in our books are the depths of many marvelous moments seen all at one time."


* * * * *

 

NEW CODEWARRIORZ THOUGHTS SITES/FORUMS

http://codewar.xoopiter.net/
EXPRESS YOURSELF ABOUT THE NEWS OF THE DAY.

 

baltimoresun.com - Bush's re-election has Canada looking better

baltimoresun.com - Bush's re-election has Canada looking better
SEATTLE -Rudi Kischer, an immigration lawyer in Vancouver, British Columbia, plans seminars in three U.S. cities - Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angeles - to tell Americans frustrated with President Bush's re-election that the grass is greener north of the border. And that's not just an allusion to Canada's lenient marijuana laws.
"We started last year getting a lot of calls from Americans dissatisfied with the way the country is going," Kischer says. "Then after the election, it's been crazy up here. The Canadian immigration Web site had 115,000 hits the day after the election - from the U.S. alone. We usually only get 20,000 hits."











There was so much interest that a Vancouver-based Internet company, Communicopia, set up a new Web site this month - www.canadianalternative.com - to suggest Canada as a viable option for its U.S. clients, including anyone concerned about bans on gay marriage passed in 11 states this month.

"We invite you to get to know Canada," the site says. "Explore the richness and diversity of our regions. And find out why Canada is the perfect alternative for conscientious, forward-thinking Americans."

Another Web site urges Canadians: "Open your heart, and your home. Marry an American. Legions of Canadians have already pledged to sacrifice their singlehood to save our southern neighbours from four more years of cowboy conservatism."

Canada suddenly has utopian appeal for many left-leaning Americans. Its universal health care, gay rights, abortion rights, gun-control laws, drug laws, opposition to the Iraq war, ban on capital punishment and ethnic diversity mirror many values of the American left.

Immigrants, including about 1 million Americans, make up nearly 20 percent of Canada's population. The United Nations named Toronto the world's most multicultural city.

And, as Michael Moore pointed out in Bowling for Columbine - required viewing for many lefties - in Canada there's apparently no reason to lock your door.

On the other hand, it's cold. The baseball's not very good - so long, Expos. And the taxes are higher, eh?

But, as one American who has his bags nearly packed likes to say, at least the taxes go toward good causes.

"I just like their way of life a lot better, and with everything the Bush administration has done - for the American people to give him their seal of approval, it's basically the last straw," says Ralph Appoldt, a resident of Portland, Ore.

"Canada's basic population is much more intelligent, polite and civilized. I like their way of government a lot better. Their tax dollars go to helping those who need it, instead of funneling money back up to the wealthy and feeding this huge military-industrial machine."

Appoldt, 50, a sales manager, and his wife, a nurse, figure that selling their house and getting their immigration approved could take more than a year. But they're moving, they insist. They've hired Kischer to help.

Though he might see a good business opportunity in the election, Kischer has no illusions of a mass American exodus to Canada. Yanks have to follow the same procedures as everybody else - the $500 application fee, the $975 landing tax, the wait of six months to two years. He expects only about 100 people at each of the how-to-move-to-Canada seminars in December.

Nancy Bray, a spokeswoman for Citizenship and Immigration Canada, said her agency's Web site received 261,000 hits from the United States in the two days after the election, but it'll be many months before officials can guess how many of them were serious.




 

Yelling fire in a crowded theater

Gun facts - yelling fire in a crowded theater
I've always found the "can't yell fire in a crowded theater" argument to be a false one, and invalid on most fronts.

First, you can yell "fire" in a crowded theater . . . if it is part of the play, or if there is an actual fire, or if doing so is part of audience participation, or if you lease the theater for private purposes and warn everyone about what you intend to do.

Given the above, what the "fire principle" actually details is the prohibition of "endangering behavior". When one exercises a reserved right in a manor that deprives others of their rights (such as the right to life being squashed by a stampeding audience), then the conflict of rights must be resolved.

The comparison breaks down further when it is noted that the "yelling fire" prohibition requires the act to be committed first, whereas most gun control legislation creates prohibitions or bureaucratic hoop-jumping exercises in advance of an endangering act . . . that might never happen (for those who like the legal terms, we are talking about "prior restraint").



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August 13, 2004   Saturday, August 14, 2004   Sunday, August 15, 2004   Monday, August 16, 2004   Tuesday, August 17, 2004   Friday, August 20, 2004   Saturday, August 21, 2004   Tuesday, August 24, 2004   Wednesday, August 25, 2004   Thursday, August 26, 2004   Friday, August 27, 2004   Sunday, August 29, 2004   Monday, August 30, 2004   Wednesday, September 01, 2004   Thursday, September 02, 2004   Friday, September 03, 2004   Saturday, September 04, 2004   Sunday, September 05, 2004   Monday, September 06, 2004   Tuesday, September 07, 2004   Wednesday, September 08, 2004   Thursday, September 09, 2004   Friday, September 10, 2004   Saturday, September 11, 2004   Sunday, September 12, 2004   Monday, September 13, 2004   Tuesday, September 14, 2004   Wednesday, September 15, 2004   Friday, September 17, 2004   Saturday, September 18, 2004   Sunday, September 19, 2004   Tuesday, September 21, 2004   Wednesday, September 22, 2004   Thursday, September 23, 2004   Friday, September 24, 2004   Saturday, September 25, 2004   Monday, September 27, 2004   Tuesday, September 28, 2004   Wednesday, September 29, 2004   Thursday, September 30, 2004   Friday, October 01, 2004   Saturday, October 02, 2004   Sunday, October 03, 2004   Monday, October 04, 2004   Tuesday, October 05, 2004   Wednesday, October 06, 2004   Thursday, October 07, 2004   Friday, October 08, 2004   Saturday, October 09, 2004   Sunday, October 10, 2004   Tuesday, October 12, 2004   Wednesday, October 13, 2004   Thursday, October 14, 2004   Friday, October 15, 2004   Saturday, October 16, 2004   Sunday, October 17, 2004   Monday, October 18, 2004   Tuesday, October 19, 2004   Wednesday, October 20, 2004   Thursday, October 21, 2004   Friday, October 22, 2004   Saturday, October 23, 2004   Sunday, October 24, 2004   Monday, October 25, 2004   Tuesday, October 26, 2004   Wednesday, October 27, 2004   Thursday, October 28, 2004   Friday, October 29, 2004   Saturday, October 30, 2004   Sunday, October 31, 2004   Monday, November 01, 2004   Tuesday, November 02, 2004   Wednesday, November 03, 2004   Thursday, November 04, 2004   Friday, November 05, 2004   Saturday, November 06, 2004   Sunday, November 07, 2004   Monday, November 08, 2004   Tuesday, November 09, 2004   Wednesday, November 10, 2004   Thursday, November 11, 2004   Friday, November 12, 2004   Saturday, November 13, 2004   Sunday, November 14, 2004   Monday, November 15, 2004   Tuesday, November 16, 2004   Wednesday, November 17, 2004   Thursday, November 18, 2004   Friday, November 19, 2004   Saturday, November 20, 2004   Sunday, November 21, 2004   Monday, November 22, 2004   Thursday, November 25, 2004   Friday, November 26, 2004   Saturday, November 27, 2004   Sunday, November 28, 2004   Tuesday, November 30, 2004   Wednesday, December 01, 2004   Thursday, December 02, 2004   Friday, December 03, 2004   Saturday, December 04, 2004   Tuesday, December 07, 2004   Wednesday, December 08, 2004   Thursday, December 09, 2004   Friday, December 10, 2004   Saturday, December 11, 2004   Sunday, December 12, 2004   Monday, December 13, 2004   Tuesday, December 14, 2004   Wednesday, December 15, 2004   Thursday, December 16, 2004   Friday, December 17, 2004   Sunday, December 19, 2004   Monday, December 20, 2004   Friday, December 24, 2004   Saturday, December 25, 2004   Sunday, December 26, 2004   Wednesday, December 29, 2004   Thursday, December 30, 2004   Friday, December 31, 2004   Monday, January 03, 2005   Wednesday, January 05, 2005   Thursday, January 06, 2005   Saturday, January 08, 2005   Sunday, January 09, 2005   Tuesday, January 11, 2005   Wednesday, January 12, 2005   Thursday, January 13, 2005   Saturday, January 15, 2005   Wednesday, January 19, 2005   Friday, January 21, 2005   Saturday, January 22, 2005   Sunday, January 23, 2005   Monday, January 24, 2005   Wednesday, January 26, 2005   Thursday, January 27, 2005   Friday, January 28, 2005   Saturday, January 29, 2005   Monday, January 31, 2005   Thursday, February 03, 2005   Friday, February 04, 2005   Saturday, February 05, 2005   Sunday, February 06, 2005   Monday, February 07, 2005   Tuesday, February 08, 2005   Wednesday, February 09, 2005   Thursday, February 10, 2005   Friday, February 11, 2005   Saturday, February 12, 2005   Sunday, February 13, 2005   Tuesday, February 15, 2005   Thursday, February 17, 2005   Saturday, February 19, 2005   Sunday, February 20, 2005   Wednesday, February 23, 2005   Saturday, February 26, 2005   Sunday, February 27, 2005   Monday, February 28, 2005   Wednesday, March 02, 2005   Thursday, March 03, 2005   Sunday, March 06, 2005   Tuesday, March 08, 2005   Wednesday, March 09, 2005   Thursday, March 10, 2005   Friday, March 11, 2005   Saturday, March 12, 2005   Sunday, March 13, 2005   Monday, March 14, 2005   Tuesday, March 15, 2005   Wednesday, March 16, 2005   Thursday, March 17, 2005   Friday, March 18, 2005   Saturday, March 19, 2005   Thursday, March 24, 2005   Friday, March 25, 2005   Saturday, March 26, 2005   Sunday, March 27, 2005   Wednesday, March 30, 2005   Thursday, March 31, 2005   Friday, April 01, 2005   Saturday, April 02, 2005   Sunday, April 03, 2005   Wednesday, April 06, 2005   Thursday, April 07, 2005   Saturday, April 09, 2005   Sunday, April 10, 2005   Monday, April 11, 2005   Thursday, April 14, 2005   Saturday, April 16, 2005   Sunday, April 17, 2005   Monday, April 18, 2005   Wednesday, April 20, 2005   Thursday, April 21, 2005   Friday, April 22, 2005   Saturday, April 23, 2005   Sunday, April 24, 2005   Tuesday, April 26, 2005   Friday, April 29, 2005   Saturday, April 30, 2005   Sunday, May 01, 2005   Monday, May 02, 2005   Tuesday, May 03, 2005   Wednesday, May 04, 2005   Thursday, May 05, 2005   Friday, May 06, 2005   Sunday, May 08, 2005   Wednesday, May 11, 2005   Thursday, May 12, 2005   Friday, May 13, 2005   Sunday, May 15, 2005   Monday, May 16, 2005   Wednesday, May 18, 2005   Thursday, May 19, 2005   Friday, May 20, 2005   Saturday, May 21, 2005   Sunday, May 22, 2005   Monday, May 23, 2005   Tuesday, May 24, 2005   Wednesday, May 25, 2005   Thursday, May 26, 2005   Friday, May 27, 2005   Saturday, May 28, 2005   Sunday, May 29, 2005   Monday, May 30, 2005   Tuesday, May 31, 2005   Wednesday, June 01, 2005   Thursday, June 02, 2005   Friday, June 03, 2005   Saturday, June 04, 2005   Sunday, June 05, 2005   Monday, June 06, 2005   Tuesday, June 07, 2005   Wednesday, June 08, 2005   Thursday, June 09, 2005   Friday, June 10, 2005   Sunday, June 12, 2005   Tuesday, June 14, 2005   Thursday, June 16, 2005   Friday, June 17, 2005   Saturday, June 18, 2005   Sunday, June 19, 2005   Monday, June 20, 2005   Tuesday, June 21, 2005   Thursday, June 23, 2005   Saturday, June 25, 2005   Sunday, June 26, 2005   Tuesday, June 28, 2005   Wednesday, June 29, 2005   Thursday, June 30, 2005   Friday, July 01, 2005   Saturday, July 02, 2005   Monday, July 04, 2005   Wednesday, July 06, 2005   Thursday, July 07, 2005   Saturday, July 09, 2005   Sunday, July 10, 2005   Friday, July 15, 2005   Sunday, July 17, 2005   Tuesday, July 19, 2005   Wednesday, July 20, 2005   Thursday, July 21, 2005   Saturday, July 23, 2005   Sunday, July 24, 2005   Tuesday, August 02, 2005   Thursday, August 04, 2005   Friday, August 05, 2005   Saturday, August 13, 2005   Wednesday, August 24, 2005   Friday, August 26, 2005   Saturday, August 27, 2005   Saturday, September 03, 2005   Wednesday, September 07, 2005   Thursday, September 08, 2005   Saturday, September 24, 2005   Wednesday, September 28, 2005   Wednesday, October 19, 2005   Thursday, October 20, 2005   Friday, October 21, 2005   Sunday, October 23, 2005   Wednesday, November 02, 2005   Monday, November 21, 2005   Wednesday, November 23, 2005   Friday, December 02, 2005   Saturday, December 10, 2005   Saturday, December 17, 2005   Sunday, December 18, 2005   Monday, December 19, 2005   Wednesday, December 21, 2005   Wednesday, January 04, 2006   Friday, January 06, 2006   Monday, January 09, 2006   Monday, January 16, 2006   Tuesday, January 17, 2006   Friday, January 20, 2006   Sunday, January 22, 2006   Saturday, January 28, 2006   Tuesday, January 31, 2006   Wednesday, February 01, 2006   Thursday, February 02, 2006   Wednesday, February 08, 2006   Thursday, February 09, 2006   Friday, February 10, 2006   Saturday, February 11, 2006   Sunday, February 12, 2006   Monday, February 13, 2006   Tuesday, February 14, 2006   Wednesday, February 15, 2006   Thursday, February 16, 2006   Saturday, February 18, 2006   Monday, February 20, 2006   Wednesday, February 22, 2006   Thursday, February 23, 2006   Sunday, March 05, 2006   Tuesday, March 07, 2006   Friday, March 24, 2006   Saturday, March 25, 2006   Wednesday, April 05, 2006   Thursday, April 06, 2006   Friday, April 07, 2006   Saturday, April 08, 2006   Tuesday, April 11, 2006   Monday, April 17, 2006   Tuesday, April 25, 2006   Thursday, April 27, 2006   Tuesday, May 09, 2006   Friday, May 12, 2006   Saturday, May 13, 2006   Sunday, May 14, 2006   Monday, May 15, 2006   Tuesday, May 16, 2006   Thursday, May 18, 2006   Friday, May 26, 2006   Sunday, May 28, 2006   Monday, May 29, 2006   Wednesday, May 31, 2006   Thursday, June 01, 2006   Sunday, June 04, 2006   Monday, June 05, 2006   Friday, June 09, 2006   Saturday, June 10, 2006   Sunday, June 11, 2006   Friday, June 16, 2006   Monday, June 19, 2006   Friday, June 23, 2006   Sunday, June 25, 2006   Tuesday, June 27, 2006   Wednesday, June 28, 2006   Friday, June 30, 2006   Sunday, July 09, 2006   Thursday, July 13, 2006   Friday, July 14, 2006   Saturday, July 15, 2006   Monday, July 17, 2006   Tuesday, July 18, 2006   Wednesday, July 19, 2006   Tuesday, July 25, 2006   Wednesday, July 26, 2006   Friday, July 28, 2006   Sunday, July 30, 2006   Monday, July 31, 2006   Thursday, August 03, 2006   Friday, August 04, 2006   Sunday, August 06, 2006   Monday, August 07, 2006   Wednesday, August 09, 2006   Thursday, August 10, 2006   Sunday, August 13, 2006   Tuesday, August 15, 2006   Thursday, August 17, 2006   Friday, August 18, 2006   Wednesday, September 06, 2006   Friday, September 08, 2006   Monday, September 11, 2006   Wednesday, September 13, 2006   Thursday, September 14, 2006   Friday, September 22, 2006   Saturday, September 23, 2006   Sunday, October 01, 2006   Tuesday, October 03, 2006   Monday, October 30, 2006   Monday, November 06, 2006   Tuesday, November 07, 2006   Sunday, November 12, 2006   Tuesday, November 21, 2006   Wednesday, November 22, 2006   Thursday, November 23, 2006   Friday, December 01, 2006   Monday, December 04, 2006   Tuesday, December 05, 2006   Thursday, December 14, 2006   Wednesday, December 20, 2006   Thursday, December 21, 2006   Friday, December 29, 2006   Wednesday, January 10, 2007   Thursday, January 11, 2007   Saturday, January 13, 2007   Monday, January 15, 2007   Wednesday, January 17, 2007   Saturday, January 20, 2007   Tuesday, January 23, 2007   Tuesday, February 20, 2007   Saturday, February 24, 2007   Sunday, February 25, 2007   Friday, March 23, 2007   Wednesday, April 04, 2007   Tuesday, April 10, 2007   Thursday, April 12, 2007   Friday, April 13, 2007   Thursday, April 19, 2007   Friday, April 20, 2007   Tuesday, April 24, 2007   Tuesday, May 08, 2007   Thursday, May 10, 2007   Friday, May 11, 2007   Monday, May 14, 2007   Tuesday, May 15, 2007   Sunday, May 20, 2007   Monday, May 21, 2007   Tuesday, May 22, 2007   Wednesday, May 23, 2007   Thursday, May 24, 2007   Sunday, May 27, 2007   Wednesday, May 30, 2007   Thursday, May 31, 2007   Friday, June 01, 2007   Monday, June 04, 2007   Wednesday, June 06, 2007   Saturday, June 09, 2007   Sunday, June 10, 2007   Monday, June 11, 2007   Friday, June 15, 2007   Tuesday, June 19, 2007   Tuesday, June 26, 2007   Wednesday, June 27, 2007   Thursday, June 28, 2007   Saturday, June 30, 2007   Monday, July 02, 2007   Tuesday, July 03, 2007   Friday, July 06, 2007   Tuesday, July 10, 2007   Friday, July 13, 2007   Tuesday, July 24, 2007   Saturday, July 28, 2007   Sunday, July 29, 2007   Monday, August 13, 2007   Sunday, August 19, 2007   Saturday, August 25, 2007   Monday, August 27, 2007   Wednesday, August 29, 2007   Friday, August 31, 2007   Friday, September 07, 2007   Wednesday, September 12, 2007   Wednesday, September 19, 2007   Friday, September 21, 2007   Friday, September 28, 2007   Tuesday, October 02, 2007   Thursday, October 11, 2007   Saturday, October 27, 2007   Thursday, November 01, 2007   Saturday, November 03, 2007   Monday, November 05, 2007   Wednesday, November 28, 2007   Tuesday, December 04, 2007   Tuesday, December 11, 2007   Friday, December 14, 2007   Friday, December 21, 2007   Tuesday, December 25, 2007   Saturday, December 29, 2007   Monday, January 07, 2008   Thursday, January 10, 2008   Saturday, January 12, 2008   Sunday, January 13, 2008   Tuesday, January 15, 2008   Friday, January 18, 2008   Saturday, January 19, 2008   Friday, January 25, 2008   Sunday, January 27, 2008   Monday, January 28, 2008   Tuesday, January 29, 2008   Sunday, February 03, 2008   Wednesday, February 06, 2008   Friday, February 08, 2008   Sunday, February 10, 2008   Monday, February 11, 2008   Tuesday, February 12, 2008   Monday, February 25, 2008   Tuesday, February 26, 2008   Monday, March 03, 2008   Tuesday, March 04, 2008   Saturday, March 22, 2008   Saturday, April 19, 2008   Wednesday, April 23, 2008   Saturday, April 26, 2008   Wednesday, April 30, 2008   Monday, May 05, 2008   Tuesday, May 13, 2008   Wednesday, May 14, 2008   Saturday, May 17, 2008   Tuesday, May 20, 2008   Saturday, May 24, 2008   Sunday, May 25, 2008   Thursday, June 12, 2008   Tuesday, June 17, 2008   Saturday, July 05, 2008   Tuesday, July 08, 2008   Monday, August 04, 2008   Thursday, August 28, 2008   Thursday, September 11, 2008   Saturday, September 20, 2008   Monday, September 22, 2008   Tuesday, September 23, 2008   Wednesday, September 24, 2008   Friday, September 26, 2008   Monday, September 29, 2008   Saturday, October 04, 2008   Wednesday, October 08, 2008   Thursday, October 09, 2008   Sunday, October 12, 2008   Wednesday, October 15, 2008   Wednesday, October 22, 2008   Thursday, October 23, 2008   Friday, October 24, 2008   Tuesday, October 28, 2008   Wednesday, October 29, 2008   Monday, November 03, 2008   Tuesday, November 04, 2008   Thursday, November 06, 2008   Saturday, November 08, 2008   Monday, November 10, 2008   Wednesday, November 19, 2008   Thursday, December 18, 2008   Monday, December 22, 2008   Sunday, January 11, 2009   Thursday, January 22, 2009   Monday, January 26, 2009   Thursday, February 19, 2009   Tuesday, February 24, 2009   Friday, February 27, 2009   Monday, March 02, 2009   Thursday, March 05, 2009   Wednesday, March 11, 2009   Thursday, March 12, 2009   Friday, March 13, 2009   Thursday, March 19, 2009   Monday, March 23, 2009   Friday, March 27, 2009   Saturday, March 28, 2009   Sunday, March 29, 2009   Thursday, April 02, 2009   Tuesday, April 07, 2009   Tuesday, April 14, 2009   Tuesday, April 21, 2009   Thursday, April 23, 2009   Saturday, April 25, 2009   Sunday, May 03, 2009   Wednesday, May 06, 2009   Tuesday, May 12, 2009   Wednesday, May 13, 2009   Thursday, May 14, 2009   Sunday, May 17, 2009   Tuesday, May 26, 2009   Wednesday, June 03, 2009   Thursday, June 04, 2009   Tuesday, June 09, 2009   Friday, June 12, 2009   Saturday, June 13, 2009   Sunday, June 14, 2009   Monday, June 22, 2009   Thursday, June 25, 2009   Saturday, July 11, 2009   Tuesday, July 14, 2009   Friday, July 24, 2009   Tuesday, August 18, 2009   Wednesday, August 19, 2009   Friday, August 21, 2009   Monday, August 24, 2009   Thursday, September 03, 2009   Wednesday, September 09, 2009   Thursday, September 10, 2009   Sunday, September 13, 2009   Monday, September 14, 2009   Tuesday, September 15, 2009   Wednesday, September 23, 2009   Friday, September 25, 2009   Sunday, September 27, 2009   Tuesday, September 29, 2009   Monday, November 02, 2009   Tuesday, November 10, 2009   Thursday, November 12, 2009   Tuesday, November 24, 2009   Thursday, February 25, 2010   Thursday, March 04, 2010   Wednesday, March 17, 2010   Tuesday, March 23, 2010   Friday, April 09, 2010   Friday, April 16, 2010   Wednesday, April 21, 2010   Thursday, April 22, 2010   Friday, April 23, 2010   Thursday, April 29, 2010   Sunday, May 02, 2010   Friday, May 07, 2010   Sunday, May 09, 2010   Monday, May 10, 2010   Tuesday, May 11, 2010   Tuesday, June 15, 2010  

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